The 2014 Angel Quiz

Each year Fr Ian prepares a quiz on the theme of angels for a priests’ gathering at Michaelmas. Here is the one for 2014. At the quiz itself points are given for humorous, if wrong, answers, as well as correct answers. Why not have a go? (Apologies that some of the questions are very UK oriented)

399px-Persian_angel_1555Answers will be given below in a week’s time.

  1. Which popular hymn contains this seldom sung verse, and how does the verse end?
And ye, beneath life’s crushing load,
Whose forms are bending low,
Who toil along the climbing way
With painful steps and slow,
Look now! for glad and golden hours
come swiftly on the wing.
O rest beside the weary road,   ……..
 

 2. Who according to tradition may weigh your soul on the last day of judgement?

 

3. a) Who in tradition, will have sounded the trumpet on the last day of judgement? and b) Which religious group believe the archangel Gabriel lived a mortal life as Noah?

4. Which Archangel has the same name as a teenage mutant ninja turtle?

5. Which Archangel, according to some ancient Christian traditions, rescues John the Baptist from the massacre of the Innocents?

13855-angel-musicians-left-panel-hans-memling6  All the following are Angelas, who are they?

i) The Shadow leader of the House of Commons

ii) The actor who plays the fictional detective of Cabots Cove

iii) A former researcher in physical chemistry and now leading world politician

7.  On which London underground line is Angel station situated?

8. Who sang:

And I said, “Fly on my sweet angel,
Fly on through the sky,
Fly on my sweet angel,
Tomorrow I’m gonna be by your side” 

 9. In which modern novel by a leading Catholic author do these words appear

“I know–from experience–how much beauty Satan carried down with him when he fell. Nobody ever said the fallen angels were the ugly ones. Oh, no, they were just as quick and light”

10. Whose final sermon contained these words:

“Thank God I’m nearer home today than I’ve ever been, Home sweet home where Jesus is, where the great apostles are, where the mighty angels are, where all our blood-washed friends are.”

Want to try some more? Try the 2010, 2011, and 2013 Angel quizzes!

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Visiting victims of human trafficking

Bishop David, Bishop of Manchester, and I visited victims of human trafficking this morning at a home run by the Medaille Trust. The house is in St Chrysostom’s Parish.

Bishop David at the Medaille Trust

Bishop David at the Medaille Trust

We received a lovely welcome from Adele, on duty, and residents. We enjoyed a cup of tea with some of the residents and heard some of their stories which included:

  • An African young lady who had been smuggled into the UK for forced labour but then disowned
  • A European migrant held as an agricultural worker in England, but then the people using her deserted the workforce leaving them homeless
  •  A young woman from Eastern Europe forced into prostitution then beaten so severely when pregnant that she lost her child and fled seeking asylum in England
  • An African young lady, who had no English, forced into domestic labour, without documents, who seeks refuge now in this country.

The work the Medaille Trust does to encourage and support such people is wonderful. With a small but dedicated staff the trust house gives residents a place to live for a while and at the same time helps them to return to their countries if they wish, or to seek work and an official status in this country. They help residents with basic living, education, help speaking English, health issues, and to understand life in England.

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Human Trafficking is shockingly common in our world. It is modern day slavery, and it is estimated it affects over 28 million people. 

The Prime Minister, David Cameron has said: ‘We have to have a really concerted approach to stamp out modern day slavery and to make sure that we look at the rights of those who are affected and take a criminal approach to those who are the traffickers and above all call it what it is: slavery.’

“The UK is primarily a destination country for trafficking. Some people are brought directly to the UK and their exploitation commences only after arrival here, while others are brought to the UK in stages and exploited in transit countries before ultimately arriving in the UK. The majority of trafficked victims in the UK are from Eastern Europe, Asia, Africa and South America.”  (From the Medaille Trust website)

Fr Ian

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Sisters to the Left?

On Sunday peace was in our minds and prayers at St Chrysostom’s Church and at the same time the Labour party conference was beginning in central Manchester.

Well St C’s aims to be inclusive and we have a wide range of political views among us – from firm Conservatives to left wing socialists, from liberal democrats to even an anarchist from time to time!

But the sisters weren’t with us at Mass on Sunday? Where were they?

Fracking

A sister on the left and a sister on the right!

Sister Diana CHN tells us:

“Jean-Mary and I were at the Christians on the Left service at St Ann’s last Sunday (at the beginning of the Labour party Conference) then we got caught up in the Climate Change rally/march in Piccadilly Gardens – while St C’s were praying for peace and launching the doves!”

And you can see the sisters caught on video- in this video clip (1 minute 12secs in)

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Doves and prayers for World Peace Day

The Bishop of Manchester decorates a paper peace dove, appropriately choosing a purple pencil to do so!

The Bishop of Manchester decorates a paper peace dove, appropriately choosing a purple pencil to do so!

World Peace Day, an initiative of the United Nations, is observed every year on September 21st.

This year at St Chrysostom’s we marked #peaceday in a special way, because of the terrible situations of war throughout the world at present, especially in the Middle East.

Bishop David began our preparations by decorating a peace dove at Church and children of St Chrysostom’s School followed his lead and produced a wonderful variety of hundreds of peace doves. People from church have joined in decorating the paper doves too.

The doves hung outside the church and along the main road to encourage those who pass by to pause and reflect on the need for peace in our world. They made a wonderful, eye catching and thought provoking display.

Hundreds of doves hung outside church

Hundreds of doves hung outside church

A simple board announced their purpose for World Peace Day, and the fact that they had been made by hundreds of children of different faiths – working together to show their longing for a better world where people of difference can live together in peace and celebration of diversity, as the children do in our local school.

The doves hang inside the church too as we bring our community’s aspirations for peace into their parish church – God’s House.

On the day itself a special Mass for Peace was offered. At the end, just before we sang the Angelus, we paused for a minute of silence in solidarity with the many peoples of the world who were pausing around midday to hold a moment of peace. We held in our thoughts and prayers those living in areas of the world where there is little peace, and those among us whose lives are far from peaceful.

Small gestures, yes, but significant ones too.

Many doves hung in the nave of Church

Many doves hung in the nave of Church

As they decorated their doves, the children were reminded that each of us can take steps on the journey to peace, and we can share peace with one another. It is our prayer that these small steps will help us all focus on our contribution for peace and strengthen our vision for world peace.

A prayer of Eric Milner White, we prayed together at Mass:

Lord God, who would fold both heaven and earth in a single peace. Let the design
of your great love shine on the waste of our angers and sorrows, and give
peace to your Church, peace among nations, peace in our homes, and peace in our hearts; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

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A Quiz and a Postcard from Barbados

Many of our parish assistants find training for the priesthood gets them out and about, and Jack must be the leader in this! He writes

Since leaving St Chrysostom’s in 2012 my life being formed for the priesthood has been full of adventures. Currently I’m spending six weeks on Barbados! Most people I told in the run-up to my departure weren’t convinced my experiences had much in common with the early Saints and Martyrs of the Faith – I can’t think why…

Codrington College

Codrington College

I’m living for six weeks at Codrington College, the seminary for the whole province of the West Indies with seminarians from Bahamas, Antigua and Guyana. My task is to explore this friendly, beautiful and fascinating island learning as much as I can about the Church here, the way priests are formed and the way people live their faith. I have met up with Helio from St Chrysostom’s who, by chance, was on Barbados for a wedding – a little piece of Manchester under the Caribbean sun. I have also managed to squeeze in time enough to visit the odd beach and sample some Bajan food and drink too. Well, it would be rude not to!

I have a little Barbados quiz for you. Each pair of pictures is a clue to a food that is popular here; can you guess what they are?   (Answers later)

Quiz Bb

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Part of God’s Rainbow Kingdom

After his visit to celebrate and preach at Mass on St Chrysostom’s day the Bishop of Manchester tweeted:

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It was good that Bishop David felt so welcomed. As he came into Church to lead our celebration of Mass he was welcomed by several church members whose first language is not English. He was greeted in Korean, Shona, Yoruba, Urdu, Latvian and Romanian. 

Bianca welcomes Bishop David in Romanian

Bianca welcomes Bishop David in Romanian

In his address Bishop David encouraged us to follow St John Chrysostom in having a ministry of welcome. This has indeed been at the heart of our ministry at St C’s for many years, and we are proud of the wonderful variety in our congregation.

Reflecting on the morning’s congregation of about 90 people I realised that in their church were:

10 people seeking asylum, 

8 people who had arrived in this country for the first time within the last three months, 

at least 11 LGBT people 

the majority of those present were under 45

and at least 10 different first languages were represented.

One church member said, yesterday,  I so enjoy coming to St Chrysostom’s to meet a wonderful variety of people…’

St C’s is a varied welcoming people indeed, – we are proud to be part of “God’s rainbow kingdom.”

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Mules bear fortunes and Christ dies of hunger at your gate

On Sunday (14th September) we celebrate our patron saint, St John Chrysostom. An energetic and courageous church leader Chrysostom was also an outstanding speaker. His eloquence earned him the nickname ‘Chrysostom’ – Golden Mouth. Fr Ian offers a reflection for our patronal festival.

John Chrysostom denounces the Empress Eudoxia

John Chrysostom denounces the Empress Eudoxia

Constantinople at the end of the fourth century, the city where Chrysostom was bishop, was a busy multicultural city. People from all over the Byzantine empire and beyond flooded to it. People of differing cultures, faiths and outlooks jostled along side each other. It was also a city where often the rich grew richer and the poor grew poorer.

Walking in our parish in Manchester I often reflect how twenty first century Manchester has many similarities to the city in which St John Chrysostom led the church. His words and example challenge us today. Chrysostom firmly held that the modern city could be inspired by Christian values. Some of his words and teachings are very much of his time, for example we can be rather aghast at some of comments on women or the Jews. Nevertheless, his preaching on practical aspects of Christianity, and above all on social justice, speaks to us in our time.

Chrysostom taught that it is not enough to give alms, to help the poor one at a time, it is also necessary to challenge structures and institutions in society, to create a new structure, a new model for society. Of course he was also a man of action as well as word and his fierce denunciation of the ruling powers for their greed led to his exile and untimely death.

Icon of St John Chrysostom in St Chrysostom's Church

Icon of St John Chrysostom in St Chrysostom’s Church

Here are some of Chrysostom’s words on social justice for us to reflect on today:

“Do you wish to honor the Body of the Saviour? Do not despise it when it is naked. Do not honour it in church with silk vestments while outside it is naked and numb with cold. He who said, “This is my body,” and made it so by his word, is the same who said, ‘You saw me hungry and you gave me no food. As you did it not to the least of these, you did it not to me.’ “

“When we teach children to be good, to be gentle, to be forgiving (all these are attributes of God), to be generous, to love … we instill virtue in their souls, and reveal the image of God within them.”

“Mules bear fortunes and Christ dies of hunger at your gate.”

“ If you have two shirts in your wardrobe, one belongs to you; the other belongs to the man who has no shirt.”

“I am often reproached for continually attacking the rich. Yes, because the rich are continually attacking the poor. But those I attack are not the rich as such, only those who misuse their wealth.”

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